Ants as pets since 2009 It starts here!
We ship every working day until 4:30 PM
Flat shipping costs from €6.99
Specialists in ants, free advice
Account

You are currently not logged in yet.

Login
0

Shopping cart

There are no products in your shopping cart yet.

Orchidee bidsprinkhaan nimf Nimfjes orchid mantis nymph Orchid mantis buy Kopen van orchidee bidsprinkhaan
Orchidee bidsprinkhaan nimf
Nimfjes orchid mantis nymph
Orchid mantis buy
Kopen van orchidee bidsprinkhaan

Orchid Praying Mantis - Hymenopus coronatus

Nymphs available stage L2-L5 Hymenopus coronatus is also called Orchid Mantis in English. She owes this name to her pink and white appearance, with which she imitates a flower.

29,99
Extra options
Limited in stock
  • Ants as pets since 2009 It starts here!
  • We ship every working day until 4:30 PM
  • Flat shipping costs from €6.99
  • Specialists in ants, free advice

Do you have questions about this product?

Or do you need help? Please feel free to contact us, we are happy to help!

Product description

Hymenopus coronatus

The nymph stage is L2 to L5. Please note: the Orchid praying mantis is difficult to keep and not suitable for beginners.

Hymenopus coronatus is also called Orchid Mantis in English. She owes this name to her pink and white appearance, with which she imitates a flower. This variety is very popular and popular because it has beautiful bright colors and grows quite large. Hymenopus coronatus is native to Malaysia.


Appearance

This type of praying mantis mimics flower leaves so that it can catch passing bees and other pollinators that come to flowers. They mainly live on white and pink flowers such as orchids.

As newly hatched nymphs, these praying mantises are orange with a black head and black legs. After the first molt they are white with bright pink. This remains the case for the rest of their lives, but some show more pink than others. It happens that there are completely white animals. When they are adults they have a green edge on their back that resembles a piece of plant. It is believed that the pink color is more prominent when the nymph is in a pink environment. A pink sheet of paper along one side of the enclosure would produce pinker nymphs. As adults, they can also change color within a few days, to more or less pink.

An adult female lives about 6 – 7 cm long, while the male only grows to about 3 cm. This difference is absolutely impossible to miss. Furthermore, the males are also narrower with slightly longer wings than the abdomen. The females are broader and have wings that extend to the abdomen.


Behaviour

Hymenopus coronatus is a quiet species of praying mantis. Usually she waits for prey. They can really go hunting when they spot prey.


Environmental requirements

The ideal temperature is approximately 28°C, but can vary between 25°C and 35°C. At night it may be slightly cooler than during the day, but at least 18°C. The males must be inhibited in their growth by a lower temperature and less food. They can be kept at a constant temperature of 18°C.
This species needs relatively high humidity. About 60 to 80% RH. The nymphs are better kept drier, they are very sensitive to an environment that is too humid. It is best to spray them very lightly once a week. As they get older you need to increase the humidity.
As with all praying mantis species, this species requires an enclosure that is at least 3x the animal's length high, and at least 2x the animal's length wide. For an adult animal this means at least 24 cm in height and 16 cm in width. A nice size for a terrarium would be 30 x 20 x 20 cm (h x w x l), so that there is also room for fake flowers and many perches.
 

Group housing

Like most praying mantis species, this species cannot be housed together in a cage. Sooner or later, cannibalism will strike. The females in particular are often very hungry. The males are also smaller, so they are easy prey. It is therefore strongly recommended to house this species separately. As young nymphs they can live together, up to about L3. Feed well, of course, with fruit flies, etc.
 

Food

Because this species lives on flowers, it mainly eats flying insects in nature. It is advisable to do this in captivity as well. Wild bees and hoverflies can be supplemented with a diet of houseflies. Crickets may also be fed, but preferably not as a staple food.

Because pollinators such as bees in the wild often carry a lot of pollen, which is also eaten by this praying mantis, it may be useful to also feed them pollen in captivity. Pollen grains can be ground and placed in a container. Food animals in that container, shake briefly, and ready to feed. The proteins and extra substances in the pollen would produce stronger and healthier animals, and more offspring per egg packet.

More information...

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us, we like it! You can reach us via email and WhatsApp. You are welcome in the showroom by appointment for advice and purchase!

Customer service  Make an appointment
© Copyright 2009-2024 Mierenboerderij.nl

Login